Andrew WARNER

Male Abt 1595 - 1684  (~ 89 years)


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  • Name Andrew WARNER  [2, 3
    • The first direct mention of Andrew Warne in America is an entry in the town records of Cambridge, Mass., then known as "Newtowne'. On January 7th, 1632/3, there are recorded several votes regarding the erection of houses in the town and the division of the pale or fence to enclose the common, with the number of rods each settler was to build. This was the first entry made in the records of the tow, except for a single item on December 24th calling a monthly meeting. Forty-two names were given in two columns, and the eleventh line in the first column reads:

      "Andrew Warner, 20 Rods"

      Twenty-four of the forty-two settlers built less than ten rods each, while only eleven built as much as twenty rods. This would indicate that Andrew Warner was already a resident of Cambridge and was among the more prominent and wealthy members of the new colony. Among the other names was that of John Steel, who afterwards married Mary, the oldest daughter of Andrew Warner.

      The same record shows that on November 4th, 1633, Andrew Warner received one "Acker" of land in an award of "Lotts for Cowyards." In January 1634, he bought one piece of "swampe ground by the 'ould feild'" and a little later another piece of three acres in the division of planting ground in the Neck.

      On February 3d, 1634, Andrew Warner was appointed on a committee of five to survey the Towne lands and enter them in a book. The constable was head of the committee and 'itt is further ordered that these 5 men meet every first Monday in the month at the Constables house...at the Ringing of the bell."

      In April 1634, a law was passed by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay Colony, requiring the inhabitants of each town to choose four or more men who, with the constable of the town, should make a record or survey of the lands of each of the inhabitants and send a report of the same to the colonial officials. Andrew Warner was chosen by the inhabitants of Cambridge or Newtowne as one of the four to act for that town.

      On May 14th, 1634, Andrew Warner was made a freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

      On November 23d, 1635, Andrew Warner was the third of nine persons "Chossen to order bussines of the whole Towne for the year following and untell new bee Chossen in their rooms,...wch nyne are to haue the power of the whole Towne as those formerly Chossen hadd." This record shows that "commission government" is not altogether a modern invention, but was practiced in the early New England colonies.

      The above records show that as early as 1632-3 Andrew Warner was residing in America and was a member of the Cambridge colony. He was born about 1595, so he was at this time thirty-seven years old--in the full vigor of early manhood. the reason for his removal to American we can only know by inference. It was during the reign of Queen Elizabeth that Protestantism was restored to England, and it was also during her reign that Puritanism appeared. Towards the close of her life, the persecutions of the Puritans, who were non-conformists to the established church, became severe, and under her successor, James I, matters became decidedly worse for them both in civil and religious affairs.

      In 1625, Charles I ascended the throne of England. He at once assumed all the power of Church and State and commenced a pitiless warfare against Puritanism. His chief instrument for that purpose was the infamous Archbishop Laud. The ministers of that religion were driven from their livings, or into exile, and the laymen were tortured and forced from their homes. Thousands of the best blood in old England sought a home or refuge in the new world.

      Among those who dared to oppose this policy was the brilliant preacher, Rev. Thomas Hooker. He was "silenced" as a minister of the church by Bishop Laud in 1626, but he continued to speak as a "lecturer" in Chelmsford, Essex County, until 1629, when the persecution became so strong that he left Chelmsford and the following year fled to Holland.

      Hooker had a powerful influence in all that part of England where he lived, and after his escape to Holland, a large number of his followers emigrated to America. These were known as the "Hooker Company" and also as the "Braintree Company" from Braintree, which was the chief town in that part of Essex County from which they came. In 1633 Mr. Hooker left Holland and came to America, where he arrived September 4th 1633, on the Griffin, to become the pastor of the church at Cambridge, made up very largely of his former followers.

      John Warner, the father of Andrew, moved to hatfield Broad Oak in Essex County, England, in 1609, where he lived until the time of his death in 1614. Hatfield is only twenty miles from Braintree, and only sixteen miles from Chelmsford where Hooker lectured from 1626-29. Andrew Warner must have lived in or near Hatfield at this time, for in 1627 his mother died at Hatfield and Andrew was the executor of her estate.

      We see, therefore, that Andrew Warner was a member of the community in England which was so profoundly stirred by the teaching of Hooker and that he came to America at the same time as the large emigration of Hooker's followers. We also learn that later he followed Hooker to Hartford and was a deacon in his church. In view of all these facts, it seems altogether probable that Andrew Warner was one of Hooker's adherents while in England; that he left England to avoid persecution, and that he came to America to find that freedom in religious worship which was denied to him in his own country.

      It is interesting to note that Andrew Warner came to America near the beginning of that great tide of emigration which started in 1629. Up to that time Plymouth and Salem had been settled, but the total English population of New England was hardly more than eight hundred. In 1629 Charles I dissolved Parliament and began his crusade against all dissenting forms of religion. In April, 1630, Winthrop left for America, followed later in the year by seventeen ships and over one thousand people. By 1634 the annual emigration had increased to four thousand. In 1640 the Long Parliament met, and the power of the King was checked and the active flood of emigration ceased, but at this time he population of New England had increased to 26,000. [1]
    Born Abt 1595  England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Fact 14 May 1634  Made a Freeman Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Died 18 Dec 1684  Hadley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Person ID I59238  Main Tree
    Last Modified 15 Oct 2021 

    Father John WARNER,   b. England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother ? UNKNOWN 
    Relationship Birth 
    Family ID F38762  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Mary ?,   b. England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 05 Oct 1624  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Mary/Mercy WARNER,   b. England Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
     2. Andrew WARNER,   b. Between 1625-1630, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jan 1681/2, Middletown, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years)  [Birth]
    +3. Robert WARNER,   d. 10 Apr 1690  [Birth]
     4. John WARNER,   d. 24 Jun 1700, Middletown, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
    +5. Hannah WARNER  [Birth]
     6. Lieut. Daniel WARNER,   b. Between 1632 and 1635, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Apr 1692, Hatfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 60 years)  [Birth]
    +7. Isaac WARNER,   b. Abt 1645,   d. 1691, Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 46 years)  [Birth]
     8. Ruth WARNER,   d. Aft 1732  [Birth]
    +9. Jacob WARNER,   d. 29 Nov 1711, Hadley, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
    Last Modified 7 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F13308  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Hester/Esther WAKEMAN,   c. 15 Jun 1617, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1693, Hadley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years) 
    Last Modified 15 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F04364  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1595 - England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 05 Oct 1624 - England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Dec 1684 - Hadley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Sources 
    1. [S10016] The Descendants of Andrew Warner, Lucien C. Warner.

    2. [S02882] One Thousand Years of Hubbard History 866 to 1895, Harlan Page Hubbard.

    3. [S02364] Genealogies of Hadley Families, Lucius M. Boltwood.